The ‘Show Sentence’

Interesting model of how to fine tune pupils’ writing to add style and precision, informed by knowledge of the context in which the text being analysed was produced…

Tabula Rasa

The Michaela approach to writing about literature involves building up sentences by combining pupils’ knowledge of poetic, theatrical and rhetorical techniques with memorised quotations, memorised facts and academic vocabulary. Through lots of guidance, we are able to elicit some pretty good sentences from the class, before letting them loose to write their own. I call this a ‘Show Sentence’. I do these pretty much every lesson so they get plenty of writing practice.

Below is a demonstration of this approach in action in a lesson. To provide a context, this would take place after they have read, discussed and annotated the text, and have memorised key quotations. I would most likely be scribbling this on the whiteboard as they go.

Year 8 (lowest set) Lesson: Shakespeare’s Macbeth

Teacher: “Fair is…?”

Pupils [chanting in unison]: “…foul and foul is fair: hover through fog and filthy air.”

Teacher: Super! Which techniques does…

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